An unapologetic look at Hospitality

Entries from July 2012

Mac users sleep better!

July 26, 2012 · Leave a Comment

Just about a month ago now, the Wall Street Journal published an article about Orbitz presenting more expensive hotels to Apple Mac users. They found out that people using Apple products spend 30% more on hotel rooms than Windows and/or Android users and are 40% more likely to book 4 and 5 star hotels.

I fail to see how this is news… We all know that Apple users pay more for a computer than Windows users and it seems they do for hotel rooms as well. How dare Orbitz target customers? The horror! For serious now, that whole storm in a tea cup got me to thinking…

Several times in my hospitality career I have been asked if it is possible to track “page positioning”. That is, if a consumer looks for a hotel in my city, on which page do I show up and on that page in which slot do I sit? Sure that’s possible! Matter of fact, I’ve already built it. But there is one question, the longer I look at it, that looms darker and darker… Why would you want to measure that?

The WSJ article makes something painfully clear. There isn’t a damn thing you can do about it anyway!

The first few slots, high up on the page, are reserved for hotels paying for placement. After that, it’s anyone’s guess where your property is going to display. Most of the things that affect placement can only be influenced by the consumer, not the hotel. That means that worrying about it is roughly as effective as painting your house with a mascara brush. Here are some of the things that are being used by sites to influence search results.

Location. It turns out that people living in New York typically book a different type of hotel than people from other places.

Referrals. If you end up on a site because you were referred by Kayak.com you are most likely to be price conscious. Likewise, if you come from Tripadvisor.com you are more likely to care about quality and less about price.

Repeat traffic. If you keep looking (even if you are just window shopping and not booking) at Holiday Inn, more than likely you will start finding more and more of those on consecutive search results.

Dollars off. Throw a nice little discount in the mix and all of this stuff is out the door yet again.

Most web sites also offer a handy little sort tool to their users. Regardless of how the site decided to display my search results, I can obliterate any of these efforts with a simple click. After all that research into which of my competitors are listed above and which below me, what have I really learned?

 

 

Categories: Hospitality · Search
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